Dr. LoSasso is one of the only surgeons in the United States who offers Nuss Procedures for adults as well as teenagers.

Sunken chest, also known as pectus excavatum, is a congenital condition that effects approximately one in about one of every 1,000 people. Mild cases are can be  just cosmetic, but severe cases restrict heart and lungs in addition to causing mental anguish.

Originally pioneered by Dr. Nuss in the 1990s, the Nuss Procedure was less invasive than previous techniques. Historically using the Nuss Procedure as an option for Pectus Excavatum surgery for adults  is less common because fully developed chests are less pliable.

In 2014 the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine published a review of a long list of studies on pectus excavatum surgery. The study concluded that although the Nuss procedure is easier on younger patients, it appears to be safe and effective on adults in the short term, at least.

Per the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Innovation), “In our opinion, patients older than 20 years with a moderate-to-severe pectus excavatum should be scheduled for a Nuss procedure as the first option to correct chest deformity.”

Although Dr. Losso previously offered Pectus Excavatum Surgery for Adults in California, it was hard to to find qualified surgeons in the mid-West. Therefore, when Dr. LoSasso moved his practice to Paramus, New Jersey in 2017, he is able to offer the Nuss Procedure and Pectus Excavatum Surgery for Adults located in a wider geographic area. Operating out of the Valley Hospital in New Jersey, Dr. LoSasso is pleased to offer Pectus Excavatum Surgery for Adults in one of the premier medical hubs in the United States. With a treatment plan in place specifically catering to patients from the Mid-West and West Coast, Dr. LoSasso’s staff is prepared to coordinate travel plans, hotel stays and follow up treatment.

Per an article originally published on KansasCity.com, “Dustin Lurvey is feeling pretty good for a guy with a steel bar inside him, pushing out his ribcage.

Before he had the bar surgically inserted a month ago, Lurvey lived 38 years with a dent in the middle of his chest that formed a funnel shape with the surrounding pectoral muscles. His sternum pressed against his inner organs, and when he exercised he struggled to breathe and could watch his heart beat through his skin.

Lurvey’s midsection is still tender from the surgery, and the bar will stay in for at least two years as his ribs, muscles and cartilage conform to their new shape. But his chest is now flat, and to Lurvey, that’s worth it.

“I’m doing better than I ever have,” he said. (article written by Andy Marso)

Read the entire article here: http://www.kansascity.com/living/health-fitness/article143843819.html#storylink=cpy